Welcome to YOUR Swing Support Center, a blog with tips to help you transition to your new straight leading arm back-swing. This blog allows us to share information which we find in articles by golf professionals or success stories submitted by GOLFSTR users. These tips have helped me and I hope they help you too.

Bill Curry, inventor of GOLFSTR

Archives for the ‘YOUR Swing Support Center’ Category

Understand Draw and Fade to Fix Your Swing

You will never be a good golfer until you understand what is causing a draw or fade. Of course it’s wonderful to control a draw or fade and avoid a hook or slice because the last two can be deadly for your game. More important is understanding the cause so that you can make very small changes in your setup to ensure that you are controlling or even minimizing your draw or fade.

Hitting from a Sloped Surface:
Anything that you do to setup for a draw or fade is exaggerated by the slope of the ground that you are standing on. ALWAYS look for perfectly flat ground when you are setting up for your drive between the tee blocks. A slight slope to the left will naturally pull your shot to the left and a slope to the right will naturally fade to the right. If the slope on the tee surface makes a difference then you can understand how the uneven ground on the fairway should even be more dangerous for your shots.

FADE: During your setup, open your club face from the direction that you are setting up to hit the ball at your point of impact.

To Fade Your Shot:
Tee up slightly higher and slightly forward than your normal position. Setup with a target line to the left of your target landing area (for right handed golfers) and slightly open your club face to point at your target. Your ball will launch up the line of your stance and then fade back to your target point.

[NOTE: Your open club face caused your ball to spin clockwise for your fade to the right.] Practice this on the range to understand how much fade you create with your open club face and make adjustments to ensure that you never create a major slice by swinging across the face of your ball.

Draw: During your setup, close your club face from the direction of your swing at the point of impact.

To Draw Your Shot:
Tee up slightly lower and slightly back than your normal position. Line up your shot to the right and slightly close your club face to create a counter-clockwise spin on your ball.

[NOTE: The direction of your swing path at the point of impact creates the path of your ball. The side spinning rotation of your ball with an open or closed face causes your draw or fade.]

Considerations for Your Draw or Fade
1/ The same rules apply when hitting with your irons (but of course you don’t use a tee to assist your setup).
2/ You can also create a draw with a slightly “stronger grip” with both hands (with the V formed by your thumb and first finger on both hands pointing to your trailing shoulder instead of your trailing arm pit). Jack Nicklaus swung with his elbow-IN during the down swing and called it his “palm-up-grip” (referring to his right palm swinging up his swing path).
3/ Swinging over the top and outside-to-in across your ball will always create a SLICE. Avoid the over-the-top swing by taking your club straight back in the backswing and using a slight loop toward your back at the start of your downswing to help you hold your lag and swing from the inside.

Practice with your GOLFSTR+ for your straight leading arm to learn the basics that cause your ball to start right or left and then draw or fade. Knowing what causes draw or fade will help you control more shots to land in the fairway. Buy your GOLFSTR+ today at www.golfstr.com

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You C A N Get Out of Every Bunker

We have all seen videos offering “the perfect swing to get out of sand traps”. Unfortunately most of us still make “fat” shots and leave over 30% of our sand trap shots in the trap. You need the right setup as well as a SINGLE THOUGHT to complete your swing and get your ball out of the trap. The missing ingredient is to take your ball and an imaginary quarter (after the ball) out of the trap.

Your problem is that you need to swing through your ball and take the sand after the ball to complete your swing. Don’t get stuck in the heavy sand. Finish your swing. Imagine that there is a quarter in the sand about an inch beyond your ball. Swing with enough power to take your ball and the sand (including the imaginary quarter) after the ball with your full follow through.

ONE THOUGHT: Take the QUARTER with your follow-through.

I like to combine that though with the proper setup that I found in a recent blog by GolferRX:

1) Widen your stance (They suggested double your driving stance but I like to dig my feet down an inch or 2 into the sand with a bit wider and open stance for stability. An open stance helps you complete your swing.)

Rickie Fowler puts more weight on his leading foot to swing under the ball and the “quarter” after the ball.

2) Put more weight on your leading foot to help you swing through the ball and the sand after the ball). This forces a weight shift forward to get that extra sand.

3) Open your clubface – your ball should be able to rest on your club face. [When you open your sand wedge face to point straight up, you need to open your stance by at least 30 degrees away from your target line so that the leading edge of your club is square to your target.]

NOTE: Deep traps and short bunker shots need a high floating shot to clear the lip of the bunker by using a 30 degree open stance. For long bunker shots close your stance closer to parallel with your target line and close your club face to get more distance than height.

4) Keep your hands centered in your stance during your set-up

5) Swing with reasonable speed to take sand 2 or 3 inches before your ball as well as your “imaginary quarter“ in the sand after the ball. Complete your follow-through and end up balanced on your leading foot. [You will never get the ball out of the sand if you don’t transfer your weight to your leading foot as you complete your swing.]

Build confidence in your ability to make consistent sand trap shots by practicing with limited lag on your trailing wrist using your GOLFSTR+. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Put Fireworks in Your Next Swing

I just thought that July 4th would be a good time to spice up your swing. We would all like to hit dead straight, sweet shots every time we swing a club. Unfortunately our swing direction or the ground slope or our hands cause slight changes in our swing resulting in a draw or a fade especially when we don’t want that shot. Why not plan for a power draw or fade to avoid surprises?

I really don’t think you want to put fireworks in your swing like Bubba Watson. His lack of recent wins is one reason why we don’t want a huge draw or fade. He really has an overkill for his draw or fade. He plans for each draw or fade which can turn into a hook or slice that flies deep into the rough on too many occasions. Of course he also hits the occasional streak where he is able to execute a controlled draw or fade and even wins some tournaments but it’s not the best plan of attach for golf if you want consistent hits.

Bubba usully setups up with an open stance but he controls his draw or fade using the direction of the club face impact on the ball from a lower plane swing to the ball

In a recent golf magazine article I found the following: “No matter how many tournaments Watson wins, he will always be looked at as a freak show like a high-wire act. He hits the ball insane distances with his driver, and all that TV announcers want to talk about when covering Watson is how much he curves the ball, 30 or 40 yards at a clip. His swing defies convention, present or past. He does things no one would teach. In that regard, he claims never to have taken a lesson. Every announcer says Watson has the best hands in golf.” —-until he looses control.

Things we should learn from Bubba:
1/ Don’t Use Extra Large Grips on your Irons and Drivers: Bubba using anywhere from 10 to 13 wraps of tape under each grip as he progresses down each grip. “His grips look like Little League bat handles.”  Those oversized grips cause all of the extra action on his ball flight. NOT what you want.

2/ Plan to control your distance as well as your cut or slice. The greater the cut or slice, the more you risk playing your next shot from the rough or the trees. Your drive is your longest shot so you really should setup to aim for one side of the fairway and curve your ball back to your target line.

3/ A guaranteed draw or fade is what you should be planning on every shot. Hitting from a slight slope or using a slight rotation on your grip can change the face direction of your club and the outcome of your shot. Don’t risk it. Setup for your draw or fade by using your ball position slightly forward or back and your trailing foot slightly back (closed) or forward (open) from your target line. [Bubba setsup extremely open to his target line.  DON’T DO IT.]

4/ Generate Your Fireworks with your Lag and Release: I like to swing straight back and up to the top (not quite as exaggerated as Jim Furyk) with a slight loop at the top to power my hit with an inside to outside swing and forcing a power draw (like Jim McLean).

Practice to consistently draw or fade your shots at the driving range. Use your straight leading arm by practicing with GOLFSTR+. Use your wrist lag to naturally generate FIREWORKS for your power draw or fade. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Are You a Dragger or a Thrower

I found this article with a startling heading: Mickelson Won’t Win US Open, and here’s why. It was a Morning News blog by JIM NELFORD (AS TOLD TO GARY VAN SICKLE) | June 6, 2019. This was a very convincing heading and I had to figure out why. As it turn out it was about Draggers and Throwers. What’s that?

Pebble Beach is a ball-striker’s paradise. It has the smallest greens on the PGA Tour and it is usually windy from its perch overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Those two things mandate precise ball-striking. As it turn out the US Open was played under very calm and saggy conditions and of course we know that Phil did not win but why was Nelford’s prediction so adamant?

Precise Ball-Striking is exactly what we all want. So if there is a way to improve our swing for a consistent way to play golf, we better get to the bottom of this. The Article States: There are two categories of players on the PGA Tour:
Draggers: Those who drag a square clubface through impact using their lower bodies. Draggers are better, more consistent ball-strikers. “A dragger is like a baseball hitter. The batter drags the bat through the impact area while the lower body rotates. Like DRAGGER golfers, batters don’t roll their forearms or wrists until after they hit the ball.”
Throwers: Those who throw the clubface in an effort to get it square at impact, using their hands, arms and shoulders. Nelford/ Gary Van Sickle estimate that throwers make up 90 percent of Tour players because that’s the only method being taught. “A thrower rotates his forearm hard through impact. It’s a flashing move that makes the clubface turn quickly in order to reach the square position at impact. This move is an effort to compensate for flaring the clubface open during the backswing and getting it out of position. Throwing the clubface back to square before impact requires meticulous timing. The throwers include the late Arnold Palmer, Phil Mickelson and most other players.”

Throwers are taught to stop the lower-body rotation during the forward swing – it’s called hitting up against the left side – so the centrifugal force of the body’s rotation helps throw the clubface back into position before impact. It’s a difficult thing to get right every time.

Jack’s hip are not open at impact and it also looks like Hogan, Faldo and Woods have the same move. They are all Draggers!

Jack Nicklaus dragged his club through impact. So did Lee Trevino, Johnny Miller and Paul Azinger among the previous generation. Among today’s stars, Dustin Johnson, Rory McIlroy, Jim Furyk and Zach Johnson are draggers. Brooks Koepka and Tiger Woods, the men who won the first two major championships this year, mix the two styles. And as it turned out Gary Woodland must be a dragger too.

In summary Throwers are upper-body players where the upper body catches up to the early hip rotation and Draggers are lower-body players where they rotate the hip and arms together through impact. Whether you are a Dragger (for more consistent ball striking) or Thrower, you need to practice with your GOLFSTR+ for a straight leading arm swing. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Control Your Swing and Control Your Game!

Let’s face it, golf is a game of control. It’s a head game. Being in the right frame of mind with calm and relaxed emotions is everything. Watching the US Open reminds us that you need a positive mental attitude to start with but on the course like Pebble Beach anything can go wrong at any time. Mental recovery after every mishit with a solid swing plan is exactly what we all need.

The pros know that a CONSISTENT SWING SPEED for every club in their bag will allow them to produce the same swing results. Their POWER SWING is consistently swung at 80% of their swing speed. In order to maintain the same POWER swing speed they make slight adjustments to compensate for distance with every club in their bag:

Gary Woodland used a tight grip and brute strength to get through the rough at the US Open.

1/ Grip Pressure: If they are in deep rough, they have no choice but to increase their grip pressure to prevent club head rotation. They know that a tight grip will steal distance out of their hit but direction of the ball is the critical concern for a safe hit.
2/ Grip Down: There is about a 10 to 20 yard distance change between each club so the pros know that they can’t get more distance out of a club without risking disaster. They always choose the club that they know can reach their target and then grip down slightly to reduce the distance that they want to hit WITHOUT changing THEIR SWING SPEED.

A Slower Swing Demands a Change in your SETUP:
In the sand, on a side slope, in the rough and especially within 50 yards of the green, you have no choice but to reduce your backswing and your swing speed. To maintain the direction of your hit you should compensate with your ball position and body positions to ensure that your release at the point of impact is straight up your target line.

Slowing down your swing changes everything. The timing for your arms, your body rotation and especially your wrist lag. Without making setup changes for a slower swing you will end up spraying your shot away from your body as you leave your club face open or hit off the toe of your club.

Gary Woodland had it all figured out to win the US Open with 4 superb rounds of golf. Brooks Koepka could not catch up.

Adjust for a Slower Swing (It’s a lot different than your 80% POWER Swing)
1/ EXPECT that your slower swing will be LAZY: That’s right, without a crisp swing through the ball, you will tend to leave your club-face open as your body rotation will be out of sync with the speed of your hip, shoulder and arm rotation.
2/ Put More pressure on your Leading Foot: A slower swing will mess up your weight transfer from your back foot to your leading foot. You can’t afford to “drift” back in your backswing so start with 60% of your weight on your leading foot.
3/ Adjust Your Footing for your Slower Swing: You need to adjust for a swing below your normal 80% Power Swing. Don’t flare your trailing foot and consider opening up your stance to ensure that you will impact squarely on the ball and to help your complete your follow-through.
4/ Make Sure to Impact your Ball First: [A GREAT PRACTICE TIP] laying a tee on the ground about 3 or 4 inches before your ball. Allow your hips to move forward OR use more pressure on your leading foot during your setup so that you swing to miss the tee and hit your ball before you skim the turf.

Adjust for your swing speed by practicing with GOLFSTR+  with every club in your bag.  Buy one today www.golfstr.com

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Your FINAL FOCUS Creates Your Shot

I was surprised to hear that our brain and visual focus have a lot to do with the success of our golf shots.  Jason Day and Jack Nicklaus visualize their shot but even more important they pick a target point to allow their brain to zero in on that point to make their planned shot. I was also surprised to see a video by Tom Stickney, a PGA Instructor on GOLF-INFO-GUIDE which highlighted the fact that your visual focus will actually allow your brain to unconsciously control the direction of your shot.

Jim McLean is shown here with a burning image around his target point and you should too.

Tom referred to a tip that he learned from one of his golf coaches.   He recommended that you follow your normal setup routine and end your pre-shot routine with a last look at your target.  The smaller the target is defined, the better your success will be in hitting that target.

I am only bring this tip to your attention as it’s exactly the same process that I have been using for my putting.  If I choose the correct target point with my rehearsed swing speed for the right break, I sink my putt.

  • If I pick a target point and focus on that point for at least 2 seconds before I return my head to focus on my ball, the target and distance are burned into my brain.
  • It’s as if I have this laser image for the line that I need to hit for my putt.
  • I feel the image in my brain even though I have moved my visual focus back to the ball.
  • Hitting my ball on that “laser target line” is the only thing that my brain can visualize and “feel”. Swinging my putter directly up that line is all that my brain will allow me to do.

Hitting a drive or a fairway shot is easier than putting on a sloped green so the direction of my shot is all that counts.  Start by planning for a draw or a fade (or a straight shot if you can count on it).

Spend your “FINAL FOCUS” when you prepare for each shot by choosing a specific target.

DO NOT LOOK at the hazard on the left or the trees on the right but focus your eyes on your chosen target.  [If your last look is at the pond, that’s where your ball will end up.]

Your final focus will lock your brain into the shot that will drive your ball directly up your target line.  Practice with GOLFSTR+  for your powerful straight arm shots on your target line.  Buy one today at www.golfstr.com  

PS.  I look for these tips to help my game as much as I want to help yours.   In my last round of golf, the rough was about 6 to 8 inches deep, so I really wanted to hit fairways and greens.  I worked on my FINAL FOCUS and hit 16 out of 18.  My playing partners kept taking free lifts out of the rough to survive the round.

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Can You Just Let Go and Make the Shot?

Is it reasonable to think that you can just let go and make the shot?   Many articles say that you can but if you don’t have the mental fortitude and proven skill-set, you really need to put a lot more effort into making every shot than “just letting it go”.   I just watched a wonderful video:  PGA Tour 2019 The Nicklaus Method presented by Nationwide. It presented the brilliance of Jack Nicklaus’ game and gave us the clues for success in our golf.

Before I saw this video, I was preparing a blog on how the brain affects our game. The left side of our brain is the analytical side where we may over analyze and mess up our shots. The right side controls our spatial thinking where we visualize our swing shape and direction to hit our target.  So how are we supposed to control our brains to control our bodies to execute the perfect swing for every drive, fairway shot and putt?  During Jack’s Memorial Tournament I was hoping to find the answers from  Jack Nicklaus.

Jack’s straight arm down stroke is dropped to the inside (denoted by the RED lines). You can see his advanced hip turn, lagged wrists with a looped downswing.

Jack developed his golf skills and then developed a mental focus to create his success. During the 1970’s he won 38 of the 171 events that he entered. He won 20% of the time and he was in the top 10 for 65% of those tournaments.  His record proves that his ideas are golden.   Here are some of the key comments which were made by Jack and others on the video:

-Mindfulness: He did not consider the end point. He did not let his success or failure of his last shot district his thoughts on his next shot. His focus was shot to shot.
-Attitude: Be smart about what you do. Take the shot that will generate the best result for you.
-Emotional Control: Refocus on the shot. Be calm and focused with no emotion. Block out problems and decide to just make the shot.
-Posture: You can see his confidence in the way he walked and “the way he carried his shoulders”.

Know your Game: Learn from your mistakes and from your successes. Know what distance you hit with each club and then adjust for the wind, altitude, humidity and ground moisture.

Smart Solid Golf: The pros can take more chances as they have better control of each shot. Mid-range handicap players should accept their weaknesses and make the safe shot with confidence that they can make it. If you hit in a poor location (in the rough or behind trees) take your “penalty” and hit for the perfect position for your next approach shot. Just be happy to find your ball and prepare for your next great shot.

Mental Focus: He knew what he could do with each of his clubs (including his 1 iron) so all he had to focus on was a perfect swing. He blocked everything out of his mind and backed off any hit when he did not have a 100% commitment to his shot or his putt.

You can’t expect to “let go and make the shot”. Even the great Jack Nicklaus used his extreme focus on every shot to block out any mental interference.  Know your ability and focus on the shots that you know you can make. Practice with GOLFSTR+ and put all of your focus on the shot that you remember making before. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Unlock your Body before You Swing

It really is surprising that the golf swing has changed to add power but the classic golf swings are still the best for the Weekend Warriors. Yes, I’m talking to you. The less exercise that you do, the more your game suffers. Pros and low handicap golfers spend a lot of time keeping mobile and in shape. The rest of us either work for a living or our aging bodies would prefer to limit active exercise. Our flexibility suffers and our golf does too.

Let’s look at some important changes that we should consider to “ACTIVATE OUR BODIES”.

Waggle: Getting your body moving before you take your swing is a critical starting point to free up your flexibility. In other words: Overcoming the FREEZE-UP. In Sam Snead’s era the waggle was a way to loosen the hands and relax the wrists and arms. Jason Dufner is still playing with that historic waggle today but very few pros are as exotic with their waggle.

The modern waggle seems to have a completely different approach as it duplicates the take-away as it loosens up the arms and hips. Golfers like Rickie Fowler, Michelle Wie and many others are now using a takeaway waggle similar to what Mike Weir started before he won the Masters in 2003. Each of these take-away waggles are a little different as they are either focused on a wrist bend, a shoulder rotation, a hip rotation or any combination of all 3.

Double Swing: Another way to keep your whole body moving is a double swing exercise that you many have seen Phil Michelson do. In this warmup exercise he uses 2 or 3 clubs and swings them forward and then backward in a continuous motion as if he is hitting in both directions. It really warms up your arms, shoulders and hips. Especially on a cold day or between nines you really can get your blood flowing before a next tee shot or on a fairway when waiting for the green to clear.

Pump Drill: Justin Rose loves to do this and we often see him practice this move before he takes a shot. He takes a straight arm backswing and then pumps down with his straight leading arm without releasing his wrists as he transfers his weight to his leading leg. He stops this motion before releasing his wrist lag. It forces the early hip shift and prevents the early casting of your wrists (which cause your over the top swing and slice).

Ben Hogan made his transition at the top with a minor leading heal lift and a major weight shift to his leading foot (like a baseball player).

Jack always lifted his leading heal to limit the strain on his back and to create more rotation for more power in his swing.

 

 

 

 

 

Learn from the Classic Pro Swing
I love what I have learned from Jack Nicklaus and many of the aging and retired pros. They lift the heal of their leading foot during their backswing to allow more freedom in their backswing for more shoulder and hip rotation. It also helps with the timing at the top of the swing to let your weight shift into your leading foot like Brooks Koepka (or any of the Major League baseball players). Golf is not baseball but that motion can really help you start your downswing with your hips as you “PUMP” your arms down before your wrist release.

Body motion or waggle just before your swing is a great starting point for every swing. Lifting your leading heal may just be that trigger that you need to allow for more “body windup” followed by your weight transfer and wrist release. Practice with GOLFSTR+ and get your body moving before your swing. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Why Golfers Don’t Break 90 !

I found this listing on-line and decided that we can all benefit by prioritizing the primary weaknesses in our game and then focusing on corrective action. The game of golf will drive you insane if you don’t make changes to improve your game.  Choose your worst problems from the list below and find your fix. Why not set a goal to lower your average score by 5 strokes this summer (be aggressive and make it happen).

Einstein defined insanity as “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”. Why not start practicing with your GOLFSTR+ to improve every swing in your game?

In the following list I found the best options to improve my game and you may want to consider doing the same. Most golfers can’t get into the 80’s consistently … even though they have the ability to do it. You refuse to play from tees that suit your ability. It’s a lot more fun to break 90 every time you play so choose the tee that allows you to reach the par 4 greens in 2 strokes. Hitting less than 30% of your Greens in Regulation is BAD for your MENTAL HEALTH so make your change today.

Brooks Koepka loads up on his back foot to build up energy for his swing.

ONE: Too many big numbers. [Hit more fairways by using less power in your swing and LEARNING TO SETUP for THE DRAW OR FADE that suits your swing on every drive. Know where your ball is going to go.]

TWO: Not enough distance off the tee. [Be happy with less distance and landing in the fairway 80% of the time. Stop trying to hit 250 yards when 220 yards will land in the fairway every time.]

Then he shifts to his leading foot as he “feels” the direction and power of his swing.

THREE: Some STUPID decisions are easy to fix. [Don’t go for the miracle shot. Take your “penalty shot” to setup for a perfect recovery shot to the green.]

FOUR: Thinking “I have to HIT the ball” instead of “collecting” the ball. [Smash vs Control: I never thought of it this way but I love the thought of feeling my shot instead of killing my shot.]

FIVE: Missing too many short putts. [Take the pin out and hit your ball with enough power to stop 12 inches past the hole (and make sure that you plan for less break). Downhill putts take a lot more care so leave the pin in and focus on rolling to the hole.]

SIX: Too many shots around the green. [Learn to pitch over hazards like water and sand traps. Open your club face and your stance, then put more pressure on your leading foot to make sure that you strike your ball before skimming the grass or taking a divot.]

SEVEN: Three-putting too often. [Keep track of your putts and make sure that your first putt stops within a 4 feet radius of the hole. (Of course better putters should focus on getting the first putt within 2 feet above, below or past the hole because short putts never go in.)

EIGHT: Too many lost fights with hazards and OB. [Focus on #2 and a save your sanity.]

NINE: Lack of confidence. [Work on #1 to #7 and your confidence will continue to improve.]

Now print this blog out and read it before every game this summer. Of course you need to practice with your GOLFSTR+ for your drives, fairway shots, approach shots and putting. Improve your game for all 6 swing fixes by practicing with GOLFSTR+. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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Cheat your Swing for More Distance

The pros all swing with a straight leading arm in their backswing and downswing for more power and distance. Aging bodies lose their flexibility for a full backswing so you better find a way to “cheat” your swing to improve your body rotation. You may not be able to hit your drives 300 yards but you can certainly add 30 to 50 yards to your drives by making a few adjustments.

Clay at Top Speed Golf suggested some of the following tricks for more body rotation in his blog. Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer figured these tricks out well before  the end of their careers.

 

On the left Jack lifts his leading foot to allow for more backswing and then on the right he shifts forward with is leading foot to force the transfer of his weight at the start of the downswing.

1/ Lift your leading heal in your backswing to allow more rotation. You don’t see the pros doing this as they want to coil their bodies during the backswing. Jack Nicklaus always used the heal lift in his swing and he used the same trick during the ceremonial tee shot this year at the Masters.

2/ Exercise and stretch your shoulders to allow for a high backswing so that you can loop down and up the slot (for more power) the way that Jim McLean and so many others recommend.

3/ Rotate your head back so that you can see your ball with your leading eye during your setup. Yes, Jack did this throughout his career. This allows you to rotate your shoulders a little more during your backswing and really forces you to keep your leading eye ball on the ball (even during your down swing).

4/ Try a takeaway waggle the way so many pros are adding motion before their swing (like Rickie Fowler, Mike Weir and Michelle Wi). When you make the Weir Waggle, just leave my head rotated slightly (the way Jack does) with your leading eye firmly focused on your ball. This is another way to hold your head rotation during your backswing (as described in #3).

5/ When you setup make sure that your trailing foot is rotated back to assist in your backswing rotation and rotate your leading foot 45 degrees forward to help you complete the finish of your swing. Flaring your feet make it easier to rotation back and then forward.

6/ Finish your follow-through with the butt of your shaft pointing outside of your target line. This will force you to avoid leaving the face of your club open at the point of impact. [You need to do this to avoid slicing your shots.]

All of these “cheats” will help with your body rotation. Don’t depend on your arms to power your swing. Power comes from shoulder and hip rotation in the backswing followed by hip and shoulder rotation as you downswing and follow-through. Practice with your GOLFSTR+ to help you generated rotation with a straight leading arm in your backswing and down to your point of impact. Buy one today at www.golfstr.com

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